Different Acupuncture Therapies

Photo of acupuncture needle in patients wrist

Japanese Acupuncture

Part of every acupuncturist's theory is to learn the 'five elements.' These elements work with what we call the 'meridian lines' which in turn govern the bones, muscles, ligaments, tendons, vessels and skin of the body. The five elements, driven by nature, are: fire, earth, metal, water and wood and give good reason as to why there are no hazardous side effects to an acupuncture treatment, unless there are contraindications to the symptoms you are displaying, which a trained professional should notice, eradicating any harm.

The connection between nature and the body isn't seen as obviously in the 21st century because of the 'out of touch' environment that we have created to function as 'easily' as possible using convenience, generally, wherever we can. The holistic part of an acupuncturists role is to take the 'patients' symptoms and turn them around, including lifestyle, emotional and physiological advice, changing how the body is adapting to its current climate.

It is not uncommon for people to suffer fatigue, constipation, depression, high blood pressure, hypothyroidism, high cholesterol and much more without giving it any consideration, unaware that they could feel so much lighter, brighter and more energetic if they sought the help they needed.

Acupuncture was originally used, over 2,000 years ago, as prevention. Using the same principles now, as they discovered way back then, it is more often called upon to find a cure, as we are ignoring our bodies first signs that it is in danger. Pain is one of the body's primary symptoms, which is its unique way of knocking on your body's front door alerting you that there is damage. Leaving the damage, thinking it will go away on its own without making any effort to find what is causing the initial response, will lead you down the sticky path of ill health and therefore it is important to see a practitioner as soon as your symptom/s arise regardless of your age.

Being comfortable around your practitioner is essential for your own well being. Connecting, trusting and opening up to them, giving them as much information about your case, past and present. As there are many medical acupuncturists around it can feel like trying to find a needle in a hay stack but start by asking friends and family who have had positive experiences, look online for good reviews and booking a practitioner once does not mean you have to keep returning to them. If you have had a bad previous experience with a practitioner please take into account that every practitioner has had different training, from different teachers and learning a different syllabus so try, try and try again. As there will be one out there who can suit your needs, giving you answers that can turn your life around.